The course

Delivery
Full-time, Part-time, Per course
Course type
Taught
Location
Edinburgh
Entry date
September

Contact

Tropical Coral Reef Course

Tropical Coral Reefs: Monitoring and Management (A11CR) is an optional course available to all students on any of our PGT Marine programmes. It involves a two week field trip where students are given the opportunity to explore the marine environment whilst learning different techniques for surveying and monitoring coral reefs. See this short film from the 2016/17 course.

Scholarships:

Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre (SAIC) funded places available for 2017/18 entry. More...

Overview

From its years of academic research and industrial consultancy experience as one of the main UK Marine Technology Centres, the University recognises the need for an interdisciplinary approach to both the development and the protection of ocean resources.

In these times of rapid global change, it is essential that scientists and environmental decision-makers understand the fundamentals of the technologies involved in different development options, whilst engineers should be encouraged to adopt an understanding of the environmental, socio-economic and political aspects of any proposed project.

This programme covers all of the above areas and its structure is sufficiently flexible to meet the wide variations in background of entrants - and their respective individual career plans. A major aim of the programme is to provide students with training in holistic approaches to addressing and solving environmental problems and we strive to maintain a mix of entrants from different disciplines, from UK, EU and overseas, and from both recent graduates as well as entrants with industrial experience. This mix has previously proven extremely useful in widening the horizons of the individual class members.

Topics covered

The programme has courses that aim to cover topics corresponding to priority areas of NERC's science strategy, particularly in the marine sustainability and climate change area of Marine Science and Technology (i.e. impacts of exploitation, role of biodiversity, water quality, climate change measures). In addition, also covered within several modules are the general priority areas of Biodiversity, Environmental Risks and Hazards, Natural Resource Management, Pollution and Waste, and, as described above, all with an emphasis on an interdisciplinary approach.

In addition, the general priority areas of Biodiversity, Environmental Risks and Hazards, Natural Resource Management, Pollution and Waste are also covered with an emphasis on an interdisciplinary approach. The aim of other training, such as collaborating with colleagues from other disciplines in teamwork exercises and generic and transferable skills included in the programme, provides a good grounding for graduates to go into relevant employment and further study.

Programme duration

The duration of the MSc is 12 months, starting in September, finishing in August. It consists of eight courses, split into two semesters (four courses per semester). The masters research project is conducted at the end of the second semester, with a final submission date in August. Graduation for Masters students normally takes place in November.

See our current and future session dates.

Course content

   Detailed course guide

Core (Mandatory) courses

  • Marine Resources and Sustainability
  • Marine Ecotoxicology
  • Applied Research Design and Analysis
  • Marine Environmental Monitoring
  • Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures
  • GIS: Geographic Information System for Marine & Environmental Scientists
  • Research Project (MSc only)

Please see the Detailed Course Guide for further particulars and optional courses.

Research projects

The research project will normally take place over the summer months after completion of the taught component of the programme. Topics for projects should be discussed with staff with a view to agreeing a title and theme for the project at the beginning of Semester 2. Students will be assigned to a supervisor within the University. Where the research project is undertaken outside the University another joint supervisor, where relevant, may be assigned from the outside organisation. Background reading and research should start once the title and theme of the project has been agreed with the supervisor and practical work can normally commence in mid-April at the end of the final taught course examinations.

Assessment

Each taught programme will be assessed by a written examination and continuous means (e.g. course essays and desk studies). Award of the Master of Science degree will depend also on the satisfactory completion of the research project on which a dissertation will be submitted. The dissertation shall represent ONE THIRD of the total assessment (i.e. equivalent to weighting of FOUR taught courses). Students must gain at least 50% average on the taught elements and 50% on the dissertation to qualify for the award of a MSc. At the discretion of the examiners, a student may be allowed to re-submit a dissertation that was deemed to be unsatisfactory. Only ONE such re-submission will be allowed. A student who fails the dissertation or does not progress to project stage because of unsatisfactory taught programme marks or is offered and fails a resit in the August exam diet, may be awarded a Diploma.

Recent publications resulting from MSc research projects (student co-authors high-lighted):

  • Brash, J. M., Cook, R. L., Mackenzie, C. L. and Sanderson, W. G. (2017). The demographics and morphometries of biogenic reefs: important considerations in conservation management. 1-10.
  • Blumenröder, J., Sechet, P., Kokonnen, J. and Hartl, M. G. J. (2017). Microplastic contamination of intertidal sediments of Scapa Flow, Orkney: a first assessment. Mar Pollut Bull. 130, 293-302.
  • Miller, M.A., Bankier, C., Al-Shaeri, M.A.M., Hartl, M.G.J. (2015. Neutral Red cytotoxicity assays for assessing in vivo carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in mussels – comparing microscope and microplate methods. Mar Pollut Bull. (101): 903-907.
  • Rouse, S., Jones, M.E.S., Porter, J.S., 2014. Spatial and temporal patterns of bryozoan distribution and diversity in the Scottish sea regions. Mar Ecol-Evol Persp. 35, 85-102.
  • Al-Shaeri, M., Ahmed, D., Mc Cluskey, F., Turner, G., Paterson, L., Dyrynda, E.A., Hartl, M.G.J., 2013. Potentiating toxicological interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes with dissolved metals. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 32, 2701-2710.
  • Jennifer Loxton, Piotr Kuklinski, James M Mair, Mary Spencer Jones, Joanne S Porter (2012) Patterns of Magnesium-Calcite Distribution in the Skeleton of Some Polar Bryozoan Species Mineralogy of Polar Bryozoan Skeletons. Lecture Notes in Earth Sciences 143:169-185
  • Hartl, M.G.J., Grigson, S., Sinet, E., 2010. Maintenance of bivalve haemocytes for the purpose of delayed DNA strand break assessment using the Comet assay. Environ. Molecul. Mutagen. 51, 64-68.
  • Harper, S. J. M., Bates, C. R., Guzman, H. M. & Mair, J. M. (2010) Acoustic mapping of fish aggregation areas to improve fisheries management in Las Perlas Archipelago, Pacific Panama In : Ocean and Coastal Management. 53, 10, p. 615-623.
  • Kennedy, E. V., Holderied, M. W., Mair, J. M., Guzman, H. M. & Simpson, S. D. 15-Nov-2010 Spatial patterns in reef-generated noise relate to habitats and communities: Evidence from a Panamanian case study In : Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. 395, 1-2, p. 85-92. 8 p.
  • McGowan, T., Cunningham, S. L., Guzman, H., Mair, J. M., M Guevara, J. & Betts, T. (2010) Mangrove forest composition and dynamics in Las Perlas Archipelago, Pacific Panama. In : International Journal of Tropical Biology and Conservation. 58/3, p. 857-869

Programme leader

The Programme leader for our Marine suite of programmes is Dr Mark Hartl, Associate Professor of Marine Biology and Director of Studies for the Life Sciences Marine and Environmental taught MSc cluster. Dr Hartl is also Director of the Centre for Marine Biodiversity & Biotechnology and a Past President of the Physiology Section of the American Fisheries Society.

Please go to markhartl.hw.ac.uk for further information on Dr Hartl's research interests and publications to date.