Head of Discipline for Chemistry

Valeria Arrighi

 

Staff by Sections

Inorganic Chemistry

Alan Welch

Jan-Willem Bos

James Cameron

Scott Dalgarno

Gareth Lloyd

Stuart Macgregor

Stephen Mansell 

Ruaraidh McIntosh

Organic Chemistry

Dave Adams

Euan Brown

Graeme Barker

Magnus Bebbington

Nicola Howarth

Arno Kraft

Ai-Lan Lee

Nick Leslie

Kevin McCullough

Colin Rickman

Filipe Vilela

Physical Chemistry

Ken McKendrick

Valeria Arrighi

David Bucknall

Matt Costen

Stuart Greaves

Maciej Gutowski

Martin McCoustra

N Hendrik Nahler

Martin Paterson

Experimental Officers and Administrative Staff

Dave Ellis

Georgina Rosair

Placement Coordinators

Industrial:  Scott Dalgarno

Honorary and Emeritus Staff

John Parker

Joe Pfab

Ruaraidh McIntosh

Research Fellow

Telephone
+44 (0)131 451 8039
Email
r.mcintosh@hw.ac.uk
Address
Room 2.06
William Perkin Building
Heriot-Watt University
Roles and responsibilities
Research

Supramolecular Chemistry and Catalysis

We aim to exploit the principles of supramolecular chemistry to construct assemblies which have application in a number of different fields.

1. Supramolecular catalysis

A depleting and increasingly unstable supply has resulted in the polymer industry seeking alternatives to petrochemical feedstocks. A potential solution to this problem is to look at developing new polymers which can be derived from sustainable resources. Utilising the principles of supramolecular chemistry we seek to create catalysts for this purpose which are capable of controlling selectivity and can function without the use of organic solvents.

Figure 1.Titanium cluster which shows activity towards the polymerisation of lactide.

 

Development of switchable micelles

The efficacy of many drugs is hindered by their poor solubility in water and therefore their ability to be absorbed into the body is reduced. We create amphiphilic molecular capsules which can contain the hydrophobic drug within its own hydrophobic core whilst the hydrophilic exterior of the capsule will aid solubility in the body. These simple molecules are capable of forming micelles activated by simple non-toxic triggers and can cycle between the two states multiple times 

Selected publications

Up-to-date publications are listed on this research profile.