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Prof. Abigail Marks BSc (Hons) (Newcastle), MSc (Sheffield), PhD (Strathclyde)

Profile

Professor of Work and Employment Studies

School of Management & Languages; Dept. of Business Management

Phone: +44 (0)131 451 3610
Address:
  • Room 1.63
    Mary Burton Building
  • School of Management & Languages; Dept. of Business Management
  • Heriot-Watt University
  • Edinburgh
  • EH14 4AS
  • United Kingdom
Abigail Marks

Research profile

Roles and responsibilities

Professor

  • Director of the Centre for Research on Work and Wellbeing (CroWW).
  • Dean's Representative for Exam Boards
  • Course Co-ordinator for Changing Trends in Employment, Critical Approaches to Management, Qualitative Research Methods
  • Teaching - Research Philosophy & Design

Abigail’s research interests focus on workplace and community identities, social class, the meaning of work and the ICT industry.

Abigail is on a number editorial boards including Work, Employment and Society, New Technology Work and Employment and the Journal of Human Resource Costing and Accounting.

She has held several visiting positions including the University of Melbourne, as well as a number of external examining appointments.  

Research

Abigail’s research interests transcend the boundary between social psychology and industrial sociology. Her interests broadly include workplace identities, class and stratification, employability and the construction of professions. She has been involved in a number of ESRC projects and is also an active ESRC reviewer. She has published in a number of leading journals including Work, Employment and Society, Human Relations and the British Journal of Industrial Relations as well as contributing to several edited collections and a research monograph.

Abigail has organised the International Labour Process Conference in 2009 and the International Workshop on Teamworking in 2010. 

Abigail is also supervising a number of PhD and MPhil students in the areas of social class, teamwork, impression management and labour process theory (Carol Au, Lakshman Wimalasema, Gavin MacLean, Jean Hsu and Anna Burzynska).

Selected publications
Refereed Journal Articles

  1. Marks, A (2010) ‘The Professional Status of Massage Therapists: Experience, Employability and Evolution’ Journal of Human Resource Costing and Accounting, 14(2).
  2. Marks, A., and Huzzard, T. (2010) ‘Employability and the ICT Worker, a study of employees in Scottish small business’, New Technology, Work and Employment, 25(2), 167-181.
  3. Findlay, P., McKinlay, A., Marks, A. and Thompson, P. (2009) ‘Collective bargaining and new work regimes: 'too important to be left to bosses'  Industrial Relations Journal, 40(3), 182-197 (Emerald Management Reviews Citation of Excellence)
  4. Marks, A., and Baldry, C. (2009) ‘Stuck in the middle with who? The class identity of knowledge workers’ Work, Employment and Society, 23(1), 49-65
  5. Marks, A., and Huzzard, T. (2008) ‘Attractive workplaces for creative workers: It’s a sign of the times’ Journal of Human Resource Costing and Accounting, 12(3), 225-239 (Emerald Highly Commended Award)
  6. Marks A., and Scholarios, D. (2008) ‘Choreographing a system: skill and employability in software work’. Economic and Industrial Democracy. 29(1) 96-124
  7. Richards. J., and Marks, A., (2007) Biting the hand that feeds: Social identity and resistance in restaurant teams. International Journal of Business Science and Applied Management. Volume 2, Issue 2.
  8. Marks, A., and Lockyer, C (2004) ‘Self-interest and knowledge work: the bugs in the programme for teamwork?’ Economic and Industrial Democracy, 25 (2) 213-238.
  9. Marks, A., and Scholarios, D. (2007) Identifying a profession: The creation of professional identities within software work. New Technology, Work and Employment, 22 (2).
  10. Marks, A., and Lockyer, C. (2005) ‘Debugging the System: The impact of location on the identity of software team members.’ International Journal of Human Resource Management, 16 (2), 219-237
  11. Scholarios, D., and Marks, A (2004) ‘Work life boundary, reciprocity, and attitudes to the organization, the special case of software workers.’ Human Resource Management Journal, 14 (2), 54-74.
  12. Marks A. (2001) 'Developing a multiple foci conceptualisation of the psychological contract'.  Employee Relations 23 (5), 454-467.
  13. Findlay, P., McKinlay, A., Marks, A. and Thompson, P. (2000) ‘In Search of Perfect People: Teamwork and Team Players in the Scottish Spirits Industry’. Human Relations, 53(12), 1549-1571.
  14. Findlay, P., McKinlay, A., Marks, A., and Thompson, P. (2000) ‘Labouring to Learn’. Employee Relations 22(5), 485-502
  15. Marks, A (2000). ‘Caught in the Cross-fire’ the complexity of psychological contracts in teamworking.  Management Research News, 23 (9/10/11)
  16. Baldry, C., Bunzel, D., Hyman, J., Marks, A., and Ramsay, H. (2000). ‘Work-life futures.’ Management Research News, 23 (9/10/11).
  17. Marks, A., Findlay, P., Hine, J. A., McKinlay, A., and Thompson, P. (1998) ‘The Politics of Partnership?’ British Journal of Industrial Relations, 36:2, 209-226.
  18. Marks, A., Findlay, P., Hine, J. A., McKinlay, A., and Thompson, P. (1998) ‘You always hurt the one you love: Violating the Psychological Contract at United Distillers’, Management Research News, 21(2/3).
  19. Marks, A., Findlay, P., Hine, J. A., McKinlay, A., and Thompson, P. (1997) ‘Handmaid’s Tale or Midwives of Change: HR Managers and Organizational Innovation,’ Strategic Change, 6 (343), 1-12.
  20. Marks, A., Findlay, P., Hine, J. A., McKinlay, A., and Thompson, P. (1997) ‘The Manufacturing of Management Strategy: Workplace Innovation and Employment Relations in the Scottish Spirits Industry, Management Research News, Vol. 20.

 

RESEARCH MONOGRAPHS

  1. Baldry, C., Bain, P., Taylor, P., Hyman, J., Scholarios, D., Marks, A., Watson, A., Gilbert, K., Gall, G., and Bunzel, D. (2007). The Meaning of Work in the New Economy. London: Palgrave.

 

Book Chapters

  1. Marks, A., and Thompson, P. (2010) ‘Beyond the Blank Slate: Identities and Interests at Work’ In Thompson, P., and Smith, C. (eds.) Working Life: Renewing Labour Process Analysis. London:Palgrave.
  2. Hyman, J., and Marks, A. (2008) ‘Frustrated Ambitions: Working in the Knowledge Economy’. In Warhurst, C., and Eikhof, D. (eds) Work less, Live More? London: Palgrave.
  3. Marks, A. and Lockyer, C. (2005) ‘Making a career in IT? The creation of professional identities in software work: Evidence from Scotland.’ In Barrett, R (ed.) REALITY BYTES: Managing the labour process of software development. London: Palgrave.
  4. Hyman, J., Lockyer, C., Marks, A., Scholarios, D. (2004) ‘Needing a New Programme? Union Membership and Attitudes towards unions amongst software workers.’ In, Brown, W, Healy, G, Heery, E, and Taylor, P (eds.) The Future of Worker Representation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  5. Marks, A., Findlay, P., McKinlay, A., and Thompson, P. (2002) ‘The Politics of Partnership’. In Ed. (Kelly, J) Industrial Relations: Critical Perspectives. Blackwell.
  6. Findlay, P., McKinlay, A., Marks, A. and Thompson, P. (1999) ‘Flexible When it Suits Them’: The Use and Abuse of Teamwork Skills’, in S. Proctor and F. Mueller (eds.) Teamworking, London: Macmillan.

 

 

Biography

Prior to joining Heriot-Watt in 2002, Abigail lectured in HRM at Strathclyde University and before that was a Research Fellow at University of Edinburgh.