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Dr Gavin Buckingham

Profile

Lecturer in Psychology

School of Life Sciences

Phone: +44 (0)131 451 3643
Address:
  • Room 2.62A
    David Brewster Building
  • School of Life Sciences
  • Heriot-Watt University
  • Edinburgh
  • EH14 4AS
  • United Kingdom
Gavin Buckingham

Research profile

Roles and responsibilities
  • Research Leader
  • Lecturer
  • Teaching: Gavin co-ordinates level 3 Research Methods and Analysis 6, and supervises final year research projects on topics related to perception and action.

 

Selected publications
  • Buckingham, G., & Goodale, M.A. (in press). Size matters: A single representation underlies our perceptions of heaviness in the size-weight illusion. PLoS ONE.
  • Buckingham, G., & Goodale, M.A. (in press). When the predictive brain gets it really wrong. Behavioural and Brain Sciences.
  • Whitwell, R., & Buckingham, G. (in press). Re-framing the action and perception dissociation in Patient DF: Haptics matter, but how? Journal of Neurophysiology.
  • Buckingham, G., Ranger, N.S., & Goodale, M.A. (2012) . Handedness, laterality, and the size-weight illusion.Cortex, 48, 1342-1350.
  • Buckingham, G. Ranger, N.S., & Goodale, M.A. (2011). The role of vision in detecting and correcting fingertip force errors during object lifting. Journal of Vision, 11: doi: 10.1167/11.1.4.
  • Buckingham, G. Ranger, N.S., & Goodale, M.A. (2011). The material-weight illusion induced by expectations alone. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 73, 36-41.
  • Buckingham, G., Main, J.C., & Carey, D.P. (2011). Asymmetries in motor attention during a cued bimanual reaching task: Left- and right-handers compared. Cortex, 47, 432-440.
  • Buckingham, G., Binsted, G., & Carey, D.P (2010). Bimanual reaching across the hemispace: Which hand is yoked to which? Brain and Cognition, 74, 341-346.
  • Buckingham, G.& Goodale, M.A. (2010).The influence of competing perceptual and motor priors in the context of the size-weight illusion. Experimental Brain Research, 205, 283-288.
  • Buckingham, G. & Goodale, M.A. (2010). Lifting without seeing: The role of vision in perceiving and acting upon the size-weight illusion. PLoS ONE, 5: e9709. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009709.
  • Buckingham, G., Carey, D.P. Colino, F.L., deGrosbois, J., & Binsted, G. (2010). Gating of vibrotactile detection during visually-guided bimanual reaches.Experimental Brain Research, 201, 411-419.
  • Buckingham, G., Cant, J.S., & Goodale, M.A. (2009). Living in a material world: how visual cues to material properties affect the way that we lift objects and perceive their weight. Journal of Neurophysiology, 102, 3111-3118.
  • Buckingham, G., & Carey, D.P. (2009). Rightward biases during bimanual reaching. Experimental Brain Research, 194, 197-206.
  • Buckingham, G., & Carey, D.P. (2008). Investigating bimanual coordination in dominant and non-dominant virtual hands. Laterality, 13, 514-526.
  • Buckingham, G., DeBruine, L.M., Little, A.C., Welling, L.L.M., Conway, C., Tiddeman, B.P., & Jones, B.C. (2006). Visual adaptation to masculine and feminine faces influences generalized preferences and perceptions of trustworthiness. Evolution and Human Behaviour, 27, 381-389.
Biography

Gavin was awarded his PhD in Psychology from the University of Aberdeen in 2008, where he was supervised by Dr David Carey. Gavin's doctoral research examined how we divide our attention when performing tasks which require both hands at the same time, in relation to handedness. Following the completion of his PhD, Gavin moved to Canada to take up a position as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Brain and Mind Institute at Western University in Ontario (Canada) working with Professor Melvyn Goodale. Gavin's work there mostly focussed on how we perceive weight and interact with objects in the world around us. In January 2013, Gavin was appointed under the Research Leader Programme as a Lecturer in Psychology at Heriot-Watt, where he is examining questions related to perception and action.

For more details please visit our Psychology Research Website, staff profiles page.

Further information

Professional Memberships

  • International Society of Motor Control.
  • Society for Neuroscience.
  • Faculty of 1000.
  • Society for the Neural Control of Movement.